NEXT MEETING: 6:00 PM, Wednesday, June 19, 2019, at the Roundup Lodge in San Lorenzo (Mimbres Valley). Potluck followed by general meeting, then our Featured Speaker: Karen G. Schollmeyer, PhD, preservation archaeologist for Archaeology Southwest, presenting: "The Cliff Valley in the 14th Century."

Friday, May 31, 2019: GCAS members can join Dr. Schollmeyer at the Woodrow Ruin near Cliff. Meet at 8:00 AM sharp at the Silver City Visitors' Center, 201 N Hudson St.

NEXT FIELD TRIP: Sunday, June 2, 2019: Marilyn Markel leads us to Pictograph Canyon and Ponderosa Ranch. Meet at the Mimbres Ranger Station (on Hwy. 35 about 11 mi. north of Hwy 152 junction) at 10:00 AM sharp.

Mimbres-Mogollon

Today's Guest Photographer: Torie Grass

TG Rock House 1 04-28-2019Torie Grass joins us today to share photos she took on a GCAS field trip to the Rock House Petroglyph Site on April 28, 2019. Torie has been a member and enthusiastic supporter of the GCAS for many years. Most recently, she volunteered her time to help make the April 2019 ASNM annual meeting in Silver City a success.

TG Rock House 2 04-28-2019The Rock House Petroglyph Site is located on New Mexico State Trust Land near a state highway. It sits opposite the Rock House Pueblo Site which fell victim to bulldozers years ago. For years it was known locally as the “Bandito” site because of a large red stereotyped Mexican figure that a vandal had painted over a petroglyph panel. In 2015, the GCAS undertook remediation of the site and safely removed the red barn paint that had defaced the petroglyphs. Torie's photo on the left illustrates a portion of that restored panel. Her photo on the right shows a different area of petroglyphs. In both images, the group demonstrates the preferred Best Practice of taking pictures of ancient symbols without touching or walking on them. When visiting any archaeological site, be as cool as this group is.

Thank you for contributing these photos, Torie!

/s/ webmaster


Today's Guest Photographer: John Fitch

JF Kipp 04-28-2019 groupThis here website loves it when our GCAS members join in the blogging fun. Meet today's Guest Photographer, John Fitch.

John has been a member of GCAS for more than 10 years. He grew up in El Paso and worked for 30 years with the Federal Government in the Washington, DC, area before returning to the Southwest in 1995. He has helped with the Cañada Alamosa and other archaeological projects for Human Systems Research in Las Cruces as well as with the Black Mountain and Woodrow Ruin projects for Colorado University.

JF Kipp 04-28-2019 perfect pithouseOn Sunday, April 28, 2019, John was one of a group who took advantage of the weekend's ASNM Annual Meeting in Silver City to visit the Kipp Ruin near Deming, New Mexico. This site was first recorded by archaeologists in the early 1900s and is currently owned and managed by the Archaeological Conservancy. Kipp is located on the floodplain of the Mimbres River in Luna County at the eastern edge of the Mimbres region, the northern edge of the Casas Grandes region, and the western edge of the Jornada Mogollon region.

JF Kipp 04-28-2019 Salado sherdKipp has pithouse structures that appear to date from 100 BCE to 1000 CE. We see an example of one such structure in John's photo above on the left. Kipp also has a post-1200 CE component that appears to have evidence of all three cultures - Mimbres, Casas Grandes, and Jornada Mogollon - that converged at this location. Evidence includes remnants of Salado polychrome pottery such as the potsherd shown in John's photo over here on the right.

Thank you, John, for sharing your photos with all of cyberspace!

/s/ webmaster

 


Let's Visit Las Cruces

image from newscenter.nmsu.eduWe at the GCAS encourage our readers to travel to Las Cruces some time between now and December 15, 2019, to visit some fine examples of Mimbres ceramics. It would make quite the day trip.

"Living in Sacred Continuum" is an assemblage of Mimbres pottery dating from 1000 CE to 1130 CE, and is now on display at the American Indian Student Center on the New Mexico State University campus in Las Cruces. The exhibit features interpretations of the pottery’s designs by five different Hopi artists with five different points of view. [Photo of the Hopi artists at work - by Atsunori Ito via NMSU. Dr. Arakawa is shown in center background.]

Continue reading "Let's Visit Las Cruces" »


Deferred, For All the Right Reasons

h/t to the GCAS's own Chris Overlock for hipping us to today's news in the Chicago Tribune.

The Art Institute of Chicago has indefinitely postponed the exhibition they had planned for May, 2019, of a private individual's collection of some 70 pieces of Mimbres pottery. The article indicates the Art Institute came to realize that grave goods comprise the majority of this private collection. Such items are inappropriate for public display.

“It’s not art,” said Patty Loew, director of Northwestern University’s Center for Native American and Indigenous Research, who...has followed the controversy within the community of Native American scholars. “If someone dug up your great-grandmother’s grave and pulled out a wedding ring or something that had been buried with her, would you feel comfortable having that item on display?”

Continue reading "Deferred, For All the Right Reasons" »


How Did Mimbreño Language Sound?

image from science.sciencemag.orgAnswer: We may never know. But there are some intriguing clues, thanks to archaeological linguists and forensic anthropologists. From an article dated March 15, 2019, in Archaeology Magazine:

"...the spread of agriculture and consumption of easier-to-chew foods may have led to changes in human jaws and their arrangement of teeth, which in turn allowed people to make new sounds and create new words....chewing tough, gritty food would have put force on hunter-gatherers’ lower jaws, making the bone grow larger so that the upper and lower teeth aligned in an “edge-to-edge” bite. Such a bite would have made it hard to push the upper jaw forward to make the sounds “f” and “v”...

Continue reading "How Did Mimbreño Language Sound?" »


Coming This Saturday: A Walking Tour!

IMG_1762 IMG_1759The Imogen F. Wilson Foundation is hosting a walking tour of their Mimbres Culture Heritage Site this coming Saturday, March 2, 2019, from 1:30PM to 2:30PM. Come learn about the history and archaeology in your own back yard as talented tour leader Marilyn Markel guides you throughout the site. IFWF explains that this walking tour involves:

The Wood House needs a roof"light walking on 1/2 mile trail of the Mattocks Ruin Pre-historic archaeological site with a member of the Imogen F Wilson Educational Foundation. Learn about the ancient people who lived in the Mimbres Valley and the homesteaders living on site in the late 1800's and early 1900's. ADA restroom, museum with gift shop, plenty of parking on site. This is an opportunity to get a good insight to what life was like in the Mimbres valley from 1000 years ago, to the mid last century.

This is a free event, however we do suggest a donation of $3. This event is open to all who wish to come."

Find more details on the IFWF/MCHS Facebook page. Come and enjoy a pleasant afternoon in the Mimbres Valley with your neighbors, and support a worthwhile cause in your community. We'll see you there!

/s/ webmaster


Registration Soon Closes for 2019 Rock Art Academy in El Paso, Texas

Badger vs. opossumThe Texas Archeological Society's two-day Rock Art Academy will be held in El Paso, Texas, on February 16-17, 2019. Registration will close at midnight on January 17, 2019.

The TAS Rock Art Academy "...explores regional rock art archeological sites, Mogollon archeological sites, and how investigators use this information to interpret the human and natural histories of an area. Classroom Bighorn sheep 1sessions for the Academy will be held at the El Paso Museum of Archaeology with field sessions at Hueco Tanks State Park..."

For registration and event details please go to this TAS page.

/s/ webmaster [Photos by Marianne Smith]


Another Missing Mimbres Bowl

From the GCAS Library/Archives:

No photos of this particular bowl are known to exist, but the following description may be accurate enough that someone may recognize it if they have seen it. This bowl was reportedly unearthed on private ranch land located east of Silver City, New Mexico, at some time during the late 1970s through the 1980s.

It was described as "...a beautiful Mimbres Classic bowl...[depicting] a Mimbres warrior standing up with a shield on one arm and a three-pronged spear-headed staff in the other..."

The individual who excavated this bowl was not related to the landowners and it appears he did not have the landowners' permission to remove this artifact. However, it does not appear that the landowners made any report of theft to any law enforcement authorities. Nevertheless it was assumed at the time that the individual who took this bowl eventually sold it to either an intermediary or directly to a private collector.

If anyone encounters a bowl matching this description, either on display or in a photograph, you are welcome to contact the GCAS via this website so at the very least we may be able to alert the individual currently in possession of it.

/s/ webmaster


Holiday Gift Ideas for the Archaeologically-Inclined

We all have that certain someone on our holiday gift list. They're the kind of person who spends a fair amount of time outdoors, exploring untold numbers of historic and ancient sites in remote locations...volunteering as a site steward to protect such sites from vandalism and looting...and spending their indoor time reading and learning even more about the places they like the best.

If you're stumped by what to give to your favorite archaeo-nerd this holiday season, you may find the following suggestions helpful:

Continue reading "Holiday Gift Ideas for the Archaeologically-Inclined" »


2019 Rock Art Academy, El Paso

Doe  maybe  between 2 male figuresRegistration is open and ongoing for the Texas Archeological Society's Rock Art Academy to be held in El Paso, Texas, on February 16-17, 2019.

FriendshipThe TAS describes the Rock Art Academy as "...a two-day Texas Archeology Academy that explores regional rock art archeological sites, Mogollon archeological sites, and how investigators use this information to interpret the human and natural histories of an area. Classroom sessions for the Academy will be held at the El Paso Museum of Archaeology with field sessions at Hueco Tanks State Park..."

The registration period for the 2019 Rock Art Academy continues through midnight on January 17, 2019. For details on this event, go to this TAS page.

/s/ webmaster [Photos by Marianne Smith]