NEXT MEETING: 6:00 PM, Wednesday, August 21, 2019, at the Roundup Lodge in San Lorenzo (Mimbres Valley). Potluck followed by general meeting, then our Featured Speaker: Gila National Forest archaeologist Bella Mollard explains "Ritual Landscapes of the Jornada Mogollon."

NEXT FIELD TRIP: Sunday, August 4, 2019 - Burro Mountains Microwave Site and C-Bar Village. Meet at 10:00 AM sharp in the Tyrone parking lot near the USPS office on Highway 90 south of Silver City. High clearance is necessary for the Microwave Site. Carpool in Tyrone or at turnoff to site. Gravel road then short hike to C-Bar Village.

Historic Sites

Still More DNA News

image from c8.alamy.comThe GCAS prefers to restrict our blog posts to the US Southwest/Northwestern Mexico region on this here website, but we always make an exception for advances in DNA technology. From a Washington Post article dated March 15, 2019:

"One day about 200 years ago, a woman enslaved on a tobacco plantation near Annapolis tossed aside the broken stem of the clay pipe she was smoking in the slave quarters where she lived....the stem bore marks where she had clenched it in her teeth as she worked. But the stem bore something else she could never have imagined: her DNA.

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Coming This Saturday: A Walking Tour!

IMG_1762 IMG_1759The Imogen F. Wilson Foundation is hosting a walking tour of their Mimbres Culture Heritage Site this coming Saturday, March 2, 2019, from 1:30PM to 2:30PM. Come learn about the history and archaeology in your own back yard as talented tour leader Marilyn Markel guides you throughout the site. IFWF explains that this walking tour involves:

The Wood House needs a roof"light walking on 1/2 mile trail of the Mattocks Ruin Pre-historic archaeological site with a member of the Imogen F Wilson Educational Foundation. Learn about the ancient people who lived in the Mimbres Valley and the homesteaders living on site in the late 1800's and early 1900's. ADA restroom, museum with gift shop, plenty of parking on site. This is an opportunity to get a good insight to what life was like in the Mimbres valley from 1000 years ago, to the mid last century.

This is a free event, however we do suggest a donation of $3. This event is open to all who wish to come."

Find more details on the IFWF/MCHS Facebook page. Come and enjoy a pleasant afternoon in the Mimbres Valley with your neighbors, and support a worthwhile cause in your community. We'll see you there!

/s/ webmaster


Do You Know SHPO?

Among the many layers of our federal government is the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). It functions under the 1966 National Historic Preservation Act and is a subagency of the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places.

The Wood House needs a roofThe National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation's historic places deemed worthy of preservation. It coordinates public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America's historic and archaeological resources. SHPO performs the essential duties of surveying, evaluating, and proposing for inclusion in the National Register significant historic buildings, and historic and archaeological sites, structures, districts, and objects.

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Have You Visited the Amerind Museum Yet?

image from upload.wikimedia.orgIf you have ever traveled along Interstate 10 in Arizona between Willcox and Benson, you may have spotted a small roadside sign in the Dragoon Mountains [photo on left via Creative Commons] directing you to the Amerind Museum off of Exit 318. The idea of a museum located in such a beautiful natural setting may have piqued your interest, but at 75 mph you were already past the exit to give much thought to a detour.

How about taking a detour there now?

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GCAS Field Trip to Paquimé, Part V

8 - Mata Ortiz 1930s-era churchTo read the complete narrative of the GCAS field trip of May 2-4, 2018, see Part I, Part II, Part III, and Part IV.

The second half of Day 2, May 3, 2018, comprised a tour of the area's historic structures, including a charming 1930s-era church in Juan Mata Ortiz.

In stark contrast to the small, well-tended church and grounds in Mata Ortiz, were 10 - Terrazas's Hacienda San Diegothe ruins of Hacienda San Diego, one of the mansions belonging to the early 20th-Century cattle baron Luis Terrazas. During the First Gilded Age, Luis Terrazas amassed a combined total of 7 million acres of ranch land, over 500,000 head of cattle, and a few hundred thousand head of horses, mules, and sheep. He was reputed at the time to be the largest individual land owner in the Americas. During the Mexican Revolution of 1916, Pancho Villa used his position as provisional governor to confiscate 11 - Hacienda San Diego portalTerrazas's land and slaughter all the livestock to feed the revolutionary army.

(This is an avocational archaeological website, so I will not personally comment upon the politics of the Terrazas-Villa era. I will leave it up to discerning websurfers to determine for themselves whether or not certain remarks are factually attributable to Luis Terrazas, such as, "Chihuahua comprises the largest part of my ranch," and "I am not from Chihuahua. Chihuahua is mine.")

Continue reading "GCAS Field Trip to Paquimé, Part V" »


GCAS Field Trip Part IV: Marcia Corl, Today's Featured Photographer

Marcia Corl, an archaeology enthusiast from Las Cruces, joined us on our international field trip to Firing Ceramics in Juan Mata OrtizPaquimé. In today's post please enjoy some of her portraits of the people living and working in the ceramics center of Juan Mata Ortiz. All photos you see in this post are Marcia Corl's, EXCEPT this large one over here on the right. Marcia says that this particular one is a photo she took of another photo that she saw hanging in one of the Mata Ortiz galleries we visited. Marcia says that this is a portrait of Juan Quezada himself, shown firing Mata Ortiz ceramics the Old Skool way - using a flaming pile of wood and cow pies. However, an image of Juan Quezada seems to be an apt introduction to the rest of Marcia's own photos of the artisans and residents of his home town. (As always, hover on a photo for a caption; and click on any photo to enlarge.)

Marcia writes:

"​I had no idea what to expect when I learned I was able to go with this bright and energetic group to Mata Ortiz and Paquimé.  I had told myself that I was not going to spend any money on pots (which I had very little room for in my house), but the trip was going to be a learning experience anyway.  Never had seen Paquimé either. We The Young Artist saved the second day of the trip for the Mata Ortiz visit. I expected to drive up to some sort of Plaza where we would find everyone with their wares, but our first stop was at a little adobe house, where I thought Luis (our guide) maybe had some personal business, until we were all escorted into the private house of a potter.  The whole bus was going in!  She had 3 walls of the small front room lined in shelves of pottery, all hand thrown, and Potter fine detailsome hand painted with a single-hair brush. The prices were on tape written in dollars below the beautiful objects, ranging from 5 dollars to 200 dollars.  The table she was to demonstrate the fine painting was on the 4th wall.  We all watched with bated breath while she marked the finely decorated white clay pot with a repeat pattern of burnt orange paint between the tiny black design already there. 

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