NEXT MEETING: Wednesday, February 16, 2022, online via Zoom at 7PM: the GCAS general meeting features Cody Dalpra M.A., R.P.A., District Archaeologist for the Las Cruces District Office of the Bureau of Land Management. Cody will discuss Landscapes of the Past American Southwest: Cultural Meaning from Ethnographic Viewshed Analysis. Cody will illustrate how visually prominent landforms throughout the US Southwest, including southern New Mexico, influenced cultural, settlement, and mobility patterns among Native American populations prior to the completion of the railroad in 1881. As usual, about a week beforehand watch your email inbox for the Zoom link to join us to hear about Cody's research and different ways of seeing the landscapes around us.

NEXT FIELD TRIP = TBA - watch this space for details as they develop.

Anthropology

Humans and Their Dog Companions

GoggieNews in DNA research does not have to directly relate to our Mimbres-Mogollon region to be featured on this here blog. Click here to read a recent article of some fascinating DNA research into how - and how far back in time - dogs became domesticated and migrated hither and yon with their human companions. Some of the researchers' conclusions surprised even them. And there are sure to be more surprises to come.

What did we humans ever do to deserve dogs?

/s/ webmaster


Online Via Zoom: Our October 20, 2021, Featured Speaker, Thatcher Rogers

TRogersOur GCAS monthly meeting in October will be a Zoom function offered by our Featured Speaker, GCAS member and Jornada Research Institute Research Associate, Thatcher Rogers. He will present "Becoming a 'Pueblo': Late Prehispanic Shifts in the Sierra Blanca as Viewed from Robinson Pueblo" - reflecting his investigations in the Northern Jornada Mogollon (Lincoln) area. As usual, expect your Zoom link via email about a week prior to the meeting, then hop online about 6:45 PM on October 20 to get settled. Thatcher will begin his talk at 7PM sharp, describing:

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Jornada Research Institute - News You Can Use

LocusBMiddleStructureThe Jornada Research Institute (JRI), headquartered in Tularosa, New Mexico, is dedicated to the study, preservation, and protection of the archaeological, ethnohistoric, historic and natural resources of the northern Chihuahuan Desert of Arizona, New Mexico, West Texas and adjacent regions. Following is one of their special upcoming events as well as a short list of other items of interest to avocational archaeologists of the Southwest:

On September 14th, 2021, Jeff Hanson will be conducting a one-day ZOOM class on The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act for continuing education credits towards New Mexico state permitting (overseen by the Historic Preservation Division). Registration fee is $80.00 (discounted to $70.00 for students and JRI members). Please contact Jeff for more information or to sign up: jefferyhanson64@gmail.com or 817-658-5544; or visit the Events page of JRI's website for more information.

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GCAS General Meeting at MCHS!

Allen denoyerWednesday, September 15, 2021, 6:30 PM: GCAS general meeting at the Mimbres Culture Heritage Site located at 12 Sage Drive in Mimbres, one block east of Highway 35 between Mile Markers 3 and 4 and just a bit north of the old Mimbres Valley Cafe.

We are thrilled to host Allen Denoyer of Archaeology Southwest who will offer us a 2 for 1 presentation. In the early part of the evening he will demonstrate flintknapping on the porch of the Gooch House. If you have never witnessed his skills, you will be amazed! Then, as it gets dark, he will present a slideshow on the Early Agricultural Time Period. Meet at 6:30 for snacks and chats, and we will briefly make any announcements that might arise before Allen's presentation starts at 7:00 PM sharp. Due to uncertain pandemic concerns, please have your masks handy, and we will see you there!

/s/ webmaster


Want Some Chocolate? Calendar This August 31 Zoom Lecture!

Chaco_vessels_cacaoA mere 2 days from now, on Tuesday August 31, 2021, at 7 PM Central Daylight Time, and free online via Zoom, Dr. Michael Ruggeri, Professor Emeritus from the City Colleges of Chicago, presents “Mesoamerica/Ancient Southwest Chocolate Trade,” sponsored by the Aztlan Listserv. He will explain that although trade between Mesoamerica and the ancient Southwest in macaws, parrot feathers, copper bells, turquoise, turkeys, and pottery has been well known to archaeologists, they have only recently become aware of the large chocolate trade that began in about the 9th century.

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Online Via Zoom: Our August 18, 2021, Featured Speaker, David Lee

David Lee at Nimjee Our monthly GCAS general meeting returns to Zoom format on Wednesday, August 18, 2021, at 7 PM. As is our Zoom custom, our brief-if-any business meeting will be immediately followed by our Featured Speaker, David Lee, founding member of Western Rock Art Research, who will present "Closer Than We Know: Comparing the Rock Art of Australia and Western North America."

David Lee is an independent rock art researcher, focusing on the function and context of Native American rock art of western North America and the rock art and associated traditional knowledge of northern Australia. He is a founding member of Western Rock Art Research, a non-profit organization located in Bishop, California and dedicated to the study and management of rock art and the cultures who produced it. He has documented rock art in California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Idaho, Oregon and Australia, and has written or co-authored many papers, reports and books on the Mojave Desert, eastern California, and Australia including "Rock Art East of the Range of Light" and "Learning to Listen: A Personal Journey to the Land of the Lightning People." In 2005 he and his wife Charlotte began a project to document the rock art and associated traditional stories of the Wardaman People in northern Australia, work that continues to shed light on how rock art fit into the lives of the peoples who made it.

David's presentation will describe how:

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Human Migration Patterns, DNA, and Vikings

Human genomeReaders of this here blog know that our basic policy is to focus upon archaeological developments in our own region because there's certainly plenty of it. However, readers also know that our policy includes an exception whenever news of advancements in DNA research is involved. Behold:

A 10-year DNA study of human remains from Viking-Age burials across Europe and beyond (generally, 750 CE - 1050 CE) is leading anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians to redefine who Vikings were. The DNA results revealed many cases of individual and group mobility, such as four brothers buried together in one Viking grave in Estonia, and a pair of cousins buried hundreds of miles apart from each other - one in Oxford, UK, and the other in Denmark. Additionally, the DNA results revealed that Vikings from certain areas preferred specific destinations for raiding and trading - refuting the traditional assumption that Vikings conducted their sailing expeditions wherever the winds of fortune carried them.

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Obsidian and Human Travel Patterns

Obsidian core  flakesObsidian was valued by ancient cultures for its sharpness and durability. Archaeologists commonly find obsidian nodules or worked obsidian in the form of points, knife blades, etc., in archaeological sites throughout the Western Hemisphere and beyond. Because of the particular way obsidian is formed, each source of obsidian has a unique geochemical signature. Thus researchers can identify where the obsidian that was used to make a particular artifact originally came from. The source provides clues about how the humans who made the artifacts interacted with other groups, either via trade or migration. In our own region, artifacts and raw material originating from the obsidian deposits at Mule Creek, New Mexico, have been found at archaeological sites up to 120 miles away.

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Ancient Americas - Linky Goodness to Events and Lectures

44 - TzintzuntzanOne advantage the covid pandemic has given us avocational archaeologists is the opportunity to become familiar with the abundance of online sources suitable for our continuing education and entertainment. Here is another such source we'd encourage everyone to check out: it's Mike Ruggeri's clearinghouse for links to lectures, events, and web pages regarding archaeological investigations throughout North, Central, and South America, including our own region of interest.

64 - Yaxchilan approach thru jungle from riverMike Ruggeri showcases Ancient Americas events on Tumblr - bookmark this link and refer to it early in each month for that whole month's list of Zoom lectures & live conferences: http://mikeruggerisevents.tumblr.com

Links to his web pages featuring the cultures of Northern Mexico, Mesoamerica, Mississippian, and many more are here: https://mikeruggerispages.tumblr.com/

Finally, to connect to YouTube videos of past lectures including those of the Amerind Foundation, Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, Steve Lekson, Paul Minnis, the Peabody Museum, and so much more throughout our hemisphere, go to this page: https://mikeruggerisyoutube.tumblr.com/

/s/ webmaster [photos of Tzintzuntzan and Yaxchilan by M.Smith]


Mimbreños y Paquiméños: Current Research by Thatcher Rogers

Ramos poly MNM Mimbres serpentGCAS member Thatcher Rogers is currently a PhD student at UNM, a ceramics analyst/archaeologist for the Office of Contract Archeology and Aspen CRM Solutions, and one of the recipients of our Nancy Coinman Grant Awards. He has kindly allowed us to include on our website his recently-published paper, "Mimbreños y Paquiméños: Historicism and the Ancestry of the Casas Grandes Ceramic Tradition."

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