NEXT MEETING: Wednesday, January 16, 2019, at 6:00 PM, at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico. No potluck dinner but refreshments provided. Featured speaker: GCAS's own Joseph A. Bryce, Assistant Curator of History and Exhibitions at the Silver City Museum, will discuss "The Fremont Culture in Utah."

NEXT FIELD TRIP: By tradition there is NO field trip in January, but watch this space for future info on one or more possible work parties at the GCAS's library room at the Mimbres Culture Heritage Site. Inventory and organizing opportunities galore!

Anthropology

Following Dr. Fumiyasu Arakawa

Fumi ArakawaEveryone calls him Fumi.

He earned his PhD in Anthropology from Washington State University in 2006, with an emphasis in geology and lithics (the scientific analysis of stone tools, chipped stone artifacts, and their debris).  He has regularly spoken at conferences and written articles in professional publications regarding lithic and pottery analysis, but from the beginning his research expanded to include topics such as the migration and settlement patterns of ancient societies based on the lithic and pottery material they left behind, and the cultural implications of that activity. All of which Fumi delivers to his audiences with his characteristic dry wit.

Continue reading "Following Dr. Fumiyasu Arakawa" »


A New Series

image from cdn-images-1.medium.comYour Faithful Webmaster is embarking upon a recurring series of blog posts featuring anthropologists, ethnologists,  and archaeologists whose work focuses on the GCAS’s special area of interest:  Mimbres-Mogollon culture and how it relates to the world as a whole. We plan to feature a different anthro/ethno/archaeologist in a short blog post about once every two months. We want to introduce their background and work to a (hopefully) broader readership than is found in the scholarly community; and to encourage the reader to learn more. We believe the more lightly educated among us should have the opportunity to appreciate the dedication and perseverance of this particular group of scientists. None of them became multimillionaires by doing dirt work. They’re in it for the love of the game.

Continue reading "A New Series" »


A New Book for Your Library

The University of Arizona Press has published an enticing new volume of the latest in Mimbres area archaeology. Avocational archaeologists as well as professionals will recognize some or all of the 30 contributing authors whose experience in the Mimbres region reflects many decades of dedicated field work and research. Edited by Drs. Barbara Roth, Patricia Gilman, and Roger Anyon, this 288-page book is available in both hard-copy and electronic editions.

List price is $65 but scroll down in the flyer below to find a sweet 30% discount coupon for hip people like you who are In The Know:

Continue reading "A New Book for Your Library" »


The 20th Biennial Mogollon Archaeology Conference - Last Call

Lonnie Ludeman, Conference Chair for the 20th Biennial Mogollon Archaeology Conference, announced that this conference is scheduled for NMSU in Las Cruces, New Mexico, from October 11-13, 2018; and is open to GCAS members to attend. 


The 20th Biennial Mogollon Archaeology Conference - Register Soon

Lonnie Ludeman, Conference Chair for the 20th Biennial Mogollon Archaeology Conference, announced that this conference is scheduled for NMSU in Las Cruces, New Mexico, from October 11-13, 2018; and is open to GCAS members to attend. 


DNA Sequencing in Chaco Canyon

This article via Western Digs is a year-and-a-half old, but it discusses the application of DNA technology image from www.pnas.org to burials that are much closer to the GCAS's home than Denisova cave.

The burials were found in Room 33, aka the Gambler's House, of Pubelo Bonito in Chaco Canyon. [Figure on right via Stephen Plog and Carrie Heitman, Hierarchy and Social Inequality in the American Southwest, A.D. 800-1200.]

From the Western Digs article: "They were interred in what’s been described as “the richest burial known in the Southwest” — 14 men and women buried over the course of 330 years in the same crypt, some accompanied by pieces of pottery and pendants, others lavished with thousands of turquoise and shell beads....And new analysis of DNA from the 14 sets of remains shows that these elites weren’t merely members of the same influential class — indeed, they were all members of the same extended family, a “dynasty” that traced its ancestry to a single woman...."

Webmaster says check it out!

/s/ webmaster


Current Issues in DNA Sequencing

image from d1o50x50snmhul.cloudfront.netOrdinarily this GCAS blog emphasizes topics that are directly related to our particular geographic area. However, this article via The Atlantic, about recent anthropological discoveries in the Denisova cave in Siberia, is relevant to us because it illustrates how DNA technology is impelling scientists to change their assumptions about how archaic and modern humans migrated, and how they interacted with the groups they encountered.

[Above photo: Excavation works in the East Chamber of Denisova Cave, Russia; by Bence Viola, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology]

Continue reading "Current Issues in DNA Sequencing" »


20th Mogollon Archaeology Conference - Make Plans

Lonnie Ludeman, Conference Chair for the 20th Biennial Mogollon Archaeology Conference, announced that this conference is scheduled for NMSU in Las Cruces, New Mexico, from October 11-13, 2018; and is open to GCAS members to attend. 


Have You Visited the Amerind Museum Yet?

image from upload.wikimedia.orgIf you have ever traveled along Interstate 10 in Arizona between Willcox and Benson, you may have spotted a small roadside sign in the Dragoon Mountains [photo on left via Creative Commons] directing you to the Amerind Museum off of Exit 318. The idea of a museum located in such a beautiful natural setting may have piqued your interest, but at 75 mph you were already past the exit to give much thought to a detour.

How about taking a detour there now?

Continue reading "Have You Visited the Amerind Museum Yet?" »


12,000-Year-Old Paleoindian Footprints in New Mexico

image from bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.comWithin the boundaries of White Sands National Monument, scientists have found tens of thousands of ancient trackways made by Pleistocene-era bison, camels, mammoths, and ground sloths in what was then the gypsum-rich sediment of a lake surrounded by savanna. Ground sloths, which stood 7 to 8 feet tall when standing upon their hind legs, became extinct about 11,700 years ago. Some anthropologists have speculated that human predation was a significant factor in their extinction. Recent discoveries of several preserved trackways of both ground sloths and humans interacting with one another in White Sands' former lake bed support that suggestion.

[The photo in the upper left was taken in the White Sands research area. It shows a barefoot human footprint (curve of heel on left, toe imprints to the right) inside a giant sloth’s crescent-shaped print. Photo by National Park Service via Associated Press.]

Continue reading "12,000-Year-Old Paleoindian Footprints in New Mexico" »