NEXT MEETING: Wednesday, August 19, 2020, 7:00 PM: General Meeting goes online via Zoom! Al Dart of Old Pueblo Archaeology presents “Old-Time Religion? The Salado Phenomenon in the Greater Southwest.” No business meeting, this will be a Zoom presentation only. Watch for an upcoming Special Bulletin with details on how to join in on this fascinating lecture.

NEXT FIELD TRIP = WATCH THIS SPACE FOR UPDATES AS TO WHEN FIELD TRIPS WILL RESUME.

Anthropology

Online via Zoom: Our August 19, 2020, Featured Speaker: Allen Dart

Wednesday, August 19, 2020, 7:00 PM, online via Zoom: the GCAS welcomes our Featured Speaker, Allen Dart, archaeologist with the US Natural Resources Conservation Service in Phoenix and founder/Executive Director of Old Pueblo Archaeology Center in Tucson. His  evening's topic: "Old Time Religion? The Salado Phenomenon in the U.S. Southwest." Join us to hear about how:

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An Announcement from the Southwest Kiln Conference for 2020

SWKCof logoThe Southwest Kiln Conference, established in 2003, is devoted to the art, science and technology of recreating the prehistoric pottery of the American Southwest. Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic they are adapting their annual conference to the circumstances. From Southwest Kiln:

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Papas Nativas: Native Potatoes

Moray_Webready_002-800x533Some time ago there was a post on this here website discussing the consumption of wild potatoes in the US Southwest by native populations as early as 8000-9000 BCE. It appears similar activity was occurring far to the south, in Andean cultures. Emergence Magazine provides us a "Potato Travelogue" of Peru. The investigative authors describe that:

Approximately 8,000 years ago, the first wild potatoes were harvested from the high-altitude soils surrounding Lake Titicaca at the foot of the Andes Mountains. Since then, more than 4,000 varieties of native potatoes—known in Peru as papas nativas—have been cultivated in the Andean highlands. On a month-long journey through Peru, we encounter the diverse flavors, cultural significance, agricultural challenges, history, and daily uses of papas nativas.

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Meet Our 2020 Coinman Grant Awards Recipient!

IMG_0944We here at the GCAS are very pleased to announce this year's recipient of our 2020 Nancy Coinman Grant Awards, Danielle Romero of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. [She might be found somewhere in that field school work photo over there on the right.]

Danielle is a third-year PhD candidate majoring in Archaeology with a minor in Anthropology, working toward her PhD dissertation in May 2021. In addition to her formal studies, Danielle works as a Graduate Assistant in UNLV's Mimbres Archaeology Lab. She has been part of UNLV's excavation and research field schools at the Elk Ridge archaeological site in the Mimbres Valley for several years. An accomplished public speaker, she often presents topics on archaeology, ceramics, and ancient cultural interactions at regional and statewide archaeological conferences. In the past she has also shared aspects of her research as a featured speaker at our own GCAS monthly meetings.

Danielle's current research is a fascinating study of how an analysis of Elk Ridge ceramics may sharpen archaeologists' understanding of the social and cultural interactions among the groups inhabiting the entire Mimbres Valley during the period from AD 200 to AD 1150. Read the details of Danielle's research in her own words.

Congratulations, Danielle!

/s/ webmaster


8th Natural History of the Gila Symposium - Soon Coming

8thGNHSThis coming Thursday, plan to attend the Eighth Natural History of the Gila Symposium, at the Global Resource Center of WNMU in Silver City from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM on February 27 and 28, 2020, with field trips offered on Saturday, February 29. Thanks to the support of the Gila National Forest Service ADMISSION IS FREE. Go to the Symposium's website for further details and more news.

The Symposium offers researchers, land managers, conservationists, educators, and the general public a place to meet and share information and ideas gathered from the Gila Region including watersheds and neighboring areas extending into southwestern New Mexico, southeastern Arizona and Mexico. The informative two-day program on Thursday and Friday features speakers addressing topics from archaeology to zoology that are relevant to our special region. The Saturday field trips reinforce the previous days' educational discussions.

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Plan to Attend the 8th Natural History of the Gila Symposium

8thGNHSPlease set aside time to attend the Eighth Natural History of the Gila Symposium, to be held in the Global Resource Center of WNMU in Silver City from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM on February 27 and 28, 2020, with field trips offered on Saturday, February 29. Thanks to the support of the Gila National Forest Service ADMISSION IS FREE. Go to the Symposium's website for further details and more news as it develops.

The Symposium provides a venue for researchers, land managers, conservationists, educators, and the general public to meet and share information and ideas gathered from the Gila Region including watersheds and neighboring areas extending into southwestern New Mexico, southeastern Arizona and Mexico. The two-day program features speakers addressing topics from archaeology to zoology that are relevant to our special region.

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Everyone's Welcome to the 8th Natural History of the Gila Symposium

8thGNHSPlease plan to attend the Eighth Natural History of the Gila Symposium, to be held in the Global Resource Center of WNMU in Silver City from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM on February 27 and 28, 2020, with field trips offered on Saturday, February 29. Thanks to the Gila National Forest Service ADMISSION IS FREE and that can't be beat. Go to the Symposium's website for further details and more news as it develops.

There is still time for anyone, especially those with an archaeological specialty, to present a paper at the Symposium. The deadline to submit your paper's abstract, however, is January 20, 2020, so step lively now and contact Dr. William Norris of the Symposium's Steering Committee immediately.

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What Can Be Done with Disturbed Sites?

Campfire pit lined with 1000 y.o. wall stones Grafitti  modern Bulldozer tracks at pueblo site 1Archaeologist Lewis Borck, PhD, would answer: quite a lot.

"Disturbance" describes an archaeological site that has been altered by either natural forces (erosion, animal activity, etc.), previous archaeological excavations, or - as is often the case these days - by vandalism or looting as shown in the photos. Dr. Borck explained in an article he wrote for the Fall 2019 issue of American Archaeology (Vol. 23 No. 3 at p. 44) that his research as a preservation archaeologist focuses upon disturbed sites rather than sites that may be more intact. He says, in part,

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Our November 20, 2019, Featured Speaker: Greg Conlin

2019-04-27 MM ASNM - Greg Conlin Bice AwardToday's Guest Blogger, GCAS President Kyle Meredith, introduces the Featured Speaker at our next GCAS general meeting on November 20, 2019:

Greg Conlin is the current GCAS Vice President in charge of Field Trips. He has been active in our group for almost 15 years, including the NM SiteWatch program, for which he is currently Site Steward for the Woodrow Ruin. He assists with our educational programs and has volunteered for professional excavations in the Gila/Mimbres area. He was a 2019 recipient of the Richard A. Bice Award for Archaeological Achievement presented by the Archaeological Society of New Mexico. For many of the past several years he has spent time traveling throughout the Andes in Ecuador, Peru, and northern Chile. His adventures take him well off the beaten path to places that most tourists have never heard of. His travelogues include photographs of sites that predate the Inca culture and give us a glimpse of ancient empires (and today's rural lifestyles) largely ignored by popular tourism.

Everyone is invited to come to the November 20 GCAS general meeting beginning at 6:00 PM at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico. Light refreshments will be provided. After the meeting, Greg will tell us about what lies "Beyond Machu Picchu: a Travelogue of Pre-Columbian Architecture in Peru." We'll see you there!

/s/ wemaster


Thatcher Rogers, 2018-2019 Coinman Grant Award Recipient

Rogers-photo-2017The GCAS is happy to have awarded funds through our group’s inaugural Nancy Coinman Grant Awards program for the 2018-2019 scholastic year to two graduate students of archaeology: Samantha (Sam) Bomkamp and Thatcher Rogers. They each have described the status of their research that our group’s Coinman awards helped support. Two days ago we published Samantha Bomkamp’s research summary; today we launch Thatcher Rogers’s progress report.

At the time of this writing Thatcher Rogers  is a PhD student in Anthropology/Archaeology at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. He is an experienced archaeologist of the southern New Mexico/northern Chihuahua region with expertise in ceramic analysis. He is also proficient at locating under-utilized museum collections and analyzing their data for potentially new insights.

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