NEXT MEETING: 6:00 PM, Wednesday, November 20, 2019: GCAS general meeting at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico. No potluck dinner, but light refreshments provided. After the meeting, our Featured Speaker, the GCAS's very own Greg Conlin, will speak about what lies "Beyond Machu Picchu: a Travelogue of Pre-Columbian Architecture in Peru."

NEXT FIELD TRIP = TBA.

Anthropology

Our November 20, 2019, Featured Speaker: Greg Conlin

2019-04-27 MM ASNM - Greg Conlin Bice AwardToday's Guest Blogger, GCAS President Kyle Meredith, introduces the Featured Speaker at our next GCAS general meeting on November 20, 2019:

Greg Conlin is the current GCAS Vice President in charge of Field Trips. He has been active in our group for almost 15 years, including the NM SiteWatch program, for which he is currently Site Steward for the Woodrow Ruin. He assists with our educational programs and has volunteered for professional excavations in the Gila/Mimbres area. He was a 2019 recipient of the Richard A. Bice Award for Archaeological Achievement presented by the Archaeological Society of New Mexico. For many of the past several years he has spent time traveling throughout the Andes in Ecuador, Peru, and northern Chile. His adventures take him well off the beaten path to places that most tourists have never heard of. His travelogues include photographs of sites that predate the Inca culture and give us a glimpse of ancient empires (and today's rural lifestyles) largely ignored by popular tourism.

Everyone is invited to come to the November 20 GCAS general meeting beginning at 6:00 PM at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico. Light refreshments will be provided. After the meeting, Greg will tell us about what lies "Beyond Machu Picchu: a Travelogue of Pre-Columbian Architecture in Peru." We'll see you there!

/s/ wemaster


Thatcher Rogers, 2018-2019 Coinman Grant Award Recipient

Rogers-photo-2017The GCAS is happy to have awarded funds through our group’s inaugural Nancy Coinman Grant Awards program for the 2018-2019 scholastic year to two graduate students of archaeology: Samantha (Sam) Bomkamp and Thatcher Rogers. They each have described the status of their research that our group’s Coinman awards helped support. Two days ago we published Samantha Bomkamp’s research summary; today we launch Thatcher Rogers’s progress report.

At the time of this writing Thatcher Rogers  is a PhD student in Anthropology/Archaeology at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. He is an experienced archaeologist of the southern New Mexico/northern Chihuahua region with expertise in ceramic analysis. He is also proficient at locating under-utilized museum collections and analyzing their data for potentially new insights.

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Samantha Bomkamp, 2018-2019 Coinman Grant Award Recipient

SB Photo 1The GCAS was pleased to award funds through our group’s inaugural Nancy Coinman Grant Awards program for the 2018-2019 scholastic year to two graduate students of archaeology: Samantha (Sam) Bomkamp and Thatcher Rogers. They have each provided us with interesting progress reports describing their research that our group’s Coinman awards helped support. Today, we begin at the front of the alphabet with Samantha Bomkamp’s research; on October 16 we will publish Thatcher Rogers’s report.

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Our October 16 Featured Co-Speaker, Leon Natker

Leon Natker via LNThe GCAS is excited to welcome two featured co-speakers to our next general meeting on Wednesday evening, October 16, 2019. We invite the general public and all GCAS members to come to 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico, to hear a special presentation on "Katsinam, Clouds, and Kivas: Evidence of the Origins of Katsinam Culture." This presentation is FREE.

Our General Meeting begins at 6:00 PM. The public is invited to attend our meeting as well as the presentation that follows. Light refreshments provided. Our featured co-speakers are Ramson Lomatewama and Leon Natker. For a preview of their presentation, go to this previous post. And now, please meet Leon Natker:

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Our October 16 Featured Co-Speaker, Ramson Lomatewama

RamsonL via CCACThe GCAS is excited to welcome not one, but two featured co-speakers to our next general meeting on Wednesday evening, October 16, 2019. We invite the general public as well as all GCAS members to come to 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico, to hear a special presentation on "Katsinam, Clouds, and Kivas: Evidence of the Origins of Katsinam Culture." This presentation is FREE.

Our General Meeting begins at 6:00 PM. The public is invited to attend our meeting as well as the presentation that follows. Light refreshments provided. Our featured co-speakers are Ramson Lomatewama (Hopi Third Mesa; Katsina father and multimedia artist), and Leon Natker (archaeologist and executive director of the Mesa Historical Museum, AZ). For a preview of their presentation, go to this previous post. And now, please meet Ramson Lomatewama:

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The Public Is Invited to Our October 16 Special Presentation!

RamsonL via Christine Szuter FB Leon Natker via LNThe Grant County Archaeological Society is excited to welcome the general public as well as all GCAS members to our next meeting on Wednesday evening, October 16, 2019, at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico, to hear a special presentation on "Katsinam, Clouds, and Kivas: Evidence of the Origins of Katsinam Culture." This presentation is FREE.

Our General Meeting begins at 6:00 PM. The public is invited to attend our meeting as well as the presentation that follows. Light refreshments provided. Our featured speakers are Ramson Lomatewama (Hopi Third Mesa; Katsina father and multimedia artist), and Leon Natker (archaeologist and executive director of the Mesa Historical Museum, AZ). To introduce their topic, Ramson and Leon explain that:

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Following Paul E. Minnis, PhD

Minnis with pickMeet Dr. Paul Minnis. He earned his PhD at the University of Michigan in 1981 and holds the title of Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. During his career he has authored, co-authored, or edited at least 12 books in addition to having written numerous journal articles and book chapters. Now retired and living in Tucson, Arizona, he speaks at professional conferences and in more informal presentations to the general public on topics such as prehispanic trade and cultural networks; and how ancient farming practices can enhance our modern world's food supply.

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Back to Back to Back Field Trip Reports - Part IV: Gila River Farm's Excavation

7 - Room with Mimbres-Mogollon features 16 - Schollmeyer in education modeOur previous post featured the fine work that Archaeology Southwest Field School students display as part of their public outreach duties. The second portion of the June 29, 2019, GCAS field trip to the Gila River Farm included a tour of this season's Field School excavations. Of particular interest was evidence the Field School uncovered of cultural convergence. In a multi-room pueblo complex, the crew found artifacts of various 14th-Century Puebloan cultures including Mimbres-Mogollon (with their distinctive wall and floor construction features), and Kayenta (with their unique ceramics including Kayenta perforated plates). It became clear from the excavations that people of different cultures, practices, and languages, migrating in and out of the region, found ways to live and work together long-term. We in the 21st Century could take a lesson.

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Following Pat Gilman, Mimbres Archaeologist

Pat Gilman describes her excavationPat Gilman had no idea that she wanted to be an archaeologist until she took an anthropology class as an undergraduate.  Even then, all she knew was that she liked anthropology in general.  It took an archaeology field school in the summer that she graduated before she knew that archaeology was the subfield of anthropology that she liked best.  A 1974 field project in the Mimbres Valley of southwestern New Mexico under the auspices of the Mimbres Foundation and Dr. Steven LeBlanc was the start of her life-long interest in research and field work in the larger Mimbres region.

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How Did Mimbreño Language Sound?

image from science.sciencemag.orgAnswer: We may never know. But there are some intriguing clues, thanks to archaeological linguists and forensic anthropologists. From an article dated March 15, 2019, in Archaeology Magazine:

"...the spread of agriculture and consumption of easier-to-chew foods may have led to changes in human jaws and their arrangement of teeth, which in turn allowed people to make new sounds and create new words....chewing tough, gritty food would have put force on hunter-gatherers’ lower jaws, making the bone grow larger so that the upper and lower teeth aligned in an “edge-to-edge” bite. Such a bite would have made it hard to push the upper jaw forward to make the sounds “f” and “v”...

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