NEXT MEETING: Wednesday, March 20, 2024, 5:00PM Mountain Daylight Saving Time (4:00PM Arizona Time): GCAS's regular monthly meeting becomes a special hybrid in-person and online Zoom charity event to be held in Silver City at the Western New Mexico University Museum at Fleming Hall on W. 10th St. next to the Aldo Leopold Charter School, to support the WNMU Museum's curation of their historic documents and photo archives. Featured Speaker: historian and award-winning author, Carolyn O’Bagy Davis, will discuss Hopi Quilts and Textiles as Cultural Artforms. We begin at 5:00 PM with a minimum $5 donation payable to the Museum at their front desk. Online participants also register with a $5 minimum donation to the Museum payable via the GCAS's secure Paypal portal. The Museum welcomes and appreciates additional donations in any other amounts to support their curation project. All such proceeds go to the WNMU Museum. A classic quilter's trunk show immediately follows Carolyn's presentation, offering original 25" x 30" quilted wall hangings designed and created by Hopi artist Bonnie Nampeyo Chapella for $150 each. The proceeds from one quilt will also be donated to the WNMU Museum. Register and donate online here, or Email the GCAS for registration info and other details.

NEXT FIELD TRIP: Sunday, March 3, 2024, Third time's a charm for the GCAS monthly field trip! At 10:00 AM sharp, meet our trip leader, Marilyn Gendron, at the intersection of Hwy 180 and Hwy 61 (City of Rocks turnoff). From there we will caravan 1/2 hour more, turn left onto the Hatch highway (26), and drive 5 miles to turn left again onto Green Leaf Mine Road (a good dirt road, fine for a street car). Here is a video of the road. Drive 10 more miles passing one check dam (at the 9:34 mark on the video), crossing a yellow cattle guard (11:07) and at the second check dam turn left and park (11:44). It is rocky and uphill to the ridge (1/4 mile?) but there is a trail. There are four petroglyph areas with wonderful images. It is exposed on the ridge with no toilet facilities. Wear sturdy shoes, dress in layers, and bring a lunch. As always, carpooling is encouraged. See you there!

PSA: Southwest Kiln Conference Postponed
Hanging Canals of Southeastern Arizona

Ancient Irrigation Techniques in the US Southwest

Hohokam canal mapMonsoon season has arrived in the US Southwest, a good time to ponder the logistical achievements of Native tribes of the past. During the period from 600 CE - 1450 CE the Hohokam established a complex canal system that reliably harnessed scarce water sources, enabling their communities to thrive for centuries. It encompassed an area of roughly 100,000 acres within the Salt River basin in what is now the greater metropolitan area of Phoenix, Arizona. It is North America's largest prehistoric irrigation canal system.

To learn more about this vast array of archaeological features, enjoy some short videos (less than 2 minutes each) presented by the City of Phoenix in their "Ancient Waterways" series and featuring local archaeologists:

September 21, 2018 - ANCIENT WATERWAYS | Masters of Water in the Desert

October 8, 2018 - ANCIENT WATERWAYS | Humans Haven't Changed Much

June 25, 2019 - ANCIENT WATERWAYS | The Importance of Irrigation to the Hohokam

June 25, 2019 - ANCIENT WATERWAYS | Hohokam Engineers

October 8, 2019 - The Largest Prehistoric Canal System is in Arizona | Ancient Waterways

/s/ webmaster

Comments

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Louise Barnes

I like the idea of condensation of humidity to obtain necessary water for agriculture and drinking. The Zurich ETH condensation system obtains water without solar power not the use of fossil fuels. A pane of glass is coated with a layer that radiates the heat away and the bottom layer is coated to have the condensation drip off. It also has a hood on top. It works 24/7. Acres of these devices could bring much needed water.

Louise Barnes

The Incas of Peru built circular terraces to obtain drinking water and as a method to water their crops. Humidity would whirl around the top of the terrace, swirl downward, get colder, condense to water drops, then water the crops. Rain water, water from the water table, and condensed water would flow down spouts to a water basin at the bottom of the terrace. Then a canal would send the water out from the basin so people would have access to it.

Louise Barnes

Please contact me about the 2 comments I posted about obtaining water from condensation. The machine produced by the Moses West Foundation is also great for obtaining drinking water from solar-powered condensation.

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