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December 2019

Fish Identification Via Petroglyph Part II

34 - Kevin H at Fish 1Following is more speculation about the images of three separate fish the GCAS observed on their December 2019 field trip to the San Diego Mountain "Three-Fish" petroglyph site. Your faithful webmaster proposes that they are not fantasy images but instead are relatively factual representations of three separate fish species, at least two of which may have been marine fish - in other words, fish not local to the rivers and lakes of the desert Southwest but to Mexico's Gulf of California.

CA opaleye and hogfish  Ensenada de Alacran 6-24-2009 Puerto Refugio Pacific porgy  7-9-2009Up above there is the petroglyphic image of Fish Number One - it measures about 22 inches long by about 10 inches high. Note the rounded head, dorsal fins set far back, and the broad tail. I venture to guess that this petroglyph may be a fair and accurate representation of either a California opaleye or a Pacific porgy. The California opaleye (photo left, upper fish) inhabits coastal waters from California south along the Baja peninsula and into the Gulf of California and can reach a bit over two feet in length. The Pacific porgy (photo right) is found from Baja California and the Gulf of California to Peru. They also reach a maximum of two feet long.

Does any fisherperson out there have samples of other possible contenders?

/s/ webmaster


Fish Identification Via Petroglyph Part I

54 - Fish 3  5' LOA Cabo Falso doradoSo far there has been no feedback to the questions posed by the fish images among the petroglyphs at the Three Fish Site, the destination of the December 2019 GCAS field trip. Therefore your faithful webmaster will present her own suppositions.

Let's begin by assuming that each of the three fish petroglyphs are factual representations of three certain fish species, made approximately to scale. Secondly, let's suppose that whoever created the fish petroglyphs may not necessarily have recorded a fish that had been caught locally, but that the artist(s) had at one time or another seen such a fish somewhere in their travels and was recording the fish from memory.

Continue reading "Fish Identification Via Petroglyph Part I" »


The Big Fun GCAS Holiday Party

Party gets thumbs up all around Pat and Mary Margaret ponder white elephant giftsOn the evening of December 18, 2019, the GCAS continued its unbroken streak of throwing an end-of-year Christmas/Holiday Potluck Party and Fabulous White Elephant Gift Exchange that all attendees claimed was a good time indeed. As is customary, Josh Reeves and President Kyle Meredith hosted the event at their Casa Otra, often used as GCAS Party HQ. Thanks again for your hospitality, Kyle and Josh!

Continue reading "The Big Fun GCAS Holiday Party" »


The Three-Fish Site Part II

33 - Fish 1The GCAS's informal name for the site of our December field trip was inspired by the three separate petroglyphs of three different fish in three different places. Every reader of this here blog is invited to ponder the images and give us their opinions of what species of fish each image may represent. Over there on the right is Fish Number One - a stand-alone petroglyph about 22 inches across by 10 inches high, more or less. (No one measured.)

Continue reading "The Three-Fish Site Part II" »


GCAS Field Trip to San Diego Mountain: the Three-Fish Site

4 - MG  KM  MC  KM at mortar 15 - John and KathrynOn December 8, 2019, 22 GCAS members congregated southeast of Hatch, New Mexico, to visit a petroglyph site most of us had never seen before. Weather forecasts threatened rain but luckily the trip stayed dry and overcast with wind increasing in the early afternoon; near-perfect conditions for photographing petroglyphs. The trail was generally easy to moderate, but one difficult section required scrambling across a canyon's side along a steep patch of rock that would have been impossible to safely traverse when wet.

Continue reading "GCAS Field Trip to San Diego Mountain: the Three-Fish Site" »


Interactive Digs for the Armchair Archaeologist

Memoskull melisa frenchSometimes we avocational archaeologists are keen to participate in an official archaeological excavation but cannot afford the fees nor tolerate a month's tent-camping in hot, pestiferous conditions. Or possess the gear and the nerves of steel to scuba dive in a pitch black cenote. [Photo by Melisa French via Archaeology Magazine.]

Continue reading "Interactive Digs for the Armchair Archaeologist" »


Site Preservation 101

A gentle reminder, Dear Reader, ICYMI the first time:

Campfire pit lined with 1000 y.o. wall stonesPlease embiggen this photo by clicking on it. What you see is a recently-built, recently-used fire pit someone erected when they visited an archaeological site located on public land. They pulled stones out of a 1000-year-old pueblo wall to build up their fire ring nice and neat. Baffling, how often this happens around here and around the world, so following are some protips for campers visiting sensitive sites:

Continue reading "Site Preservation 101" »


Tomorrow Is Giving Tuesday

IMG_0063Each year, Giving Tuesday kicks off the international holiday and end-of-year charitable season on the Tuesday following Thanksgiving. In 2019, that Tuesday falls on December 3. Tomorrow, that is. Typepad - our website's blogging platform  - will announce our nonprofit charitable organization in a social media blast associated with Giving Tuesday.

This is our first time participating in Giving Tuesday. From 12:01 AM to 11:59 PM on Tuesday, December 3, 2019, everyone is invited to donate generously to the GCAS to support the educational programs, library, and general funding we provide in furtherance of our mission of preservation and protection of our region's historic, cultural, and archaeological resources.

Continue reading "Tomorrow Is Giving Tuesday" »