NEXT MEETING: 6:00 PM, Wednesday, November 20, 2019: GCAS general meeting at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico. No potluck dinner, but light refreshments provided. After the meeting, our Featured Speaker, the GCAS's very own Greg Conlin, will speak about what lies "Beyond Machu Picchu: a Travelogue of Pre-Columbian Architecture in Peru."

NEXT FIELD TRIP = Sunday, November 3, 2019: Fort Bowie, Arizona. MEET FIRST at 10:00 AM sharp at the Tyrone parking lot near the US Post Office building on Highway 90. The convoy will then drive about 2 hours to the Fort Bowie National Historic Site via Highway 90 to Lordsburg > I-10 West > Exit 362 to Apache Pass Road, to meet at the trailhead for lunch at about noon. DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS AT 2AM ON SUNDAY NOVEMBER 3, SO NEW MEXICO AND ARIZONA RETURN TO THE SAME TIME ZONE WHEN THIS FIELD TRIP BEGINS. This is a 3-mile loop trip. Bring lunch and water. More details at the Fort Bowie website.

Las Cruces Lecture Series Soon Coming
2019 Southwest Kiln Conference - Last Call

The Public Is Invited to Our October 16 Special Presentation!

RamsonL via Christine Szuter FB Leon Natker via LNThe Grant County Archaeological Society is excited to welcome the general public as well as all GCAS members to our next meeting on Wednesday evening, October 16, 2019, at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico, to hear a special presentation on "Katsinam, Clouds, and Kivas: Evidence of the Origins of Katsinam Culture." This presentation is FREE.

Our General Meeting begins at 6:00 PM. The public is invited to attend our meeting as well as the presentation that follows. Light refreshments provided. Our featured speakers are Ramson Lomatewama (Hopi Third Mesa; Katsina father and multimedia artist), and Leon Natker (archaeologist and executive director of the Mesa Historical Museum, AZ). To introduce their topic, Ramson and Leon explain that:

"Katsinam are an iconic symbol of the Native American southwest, but research on the genesis of the ceremonial practice, sometimes referred to as the Katsina cult, has been elusive. Earlier researchers, often using theoretical constructs based in colonialism, hypothesized it was an import, possibly from as far away as the valley of Mexico. In this paper we review earlier research on the origin of the Katsina culture, taking into account the theoretical constructs and assumptions earlier researchers used. We review more recent research that explores imagery of ceramics, rock art, and kiva murals, and the movement of trade goods containing these images, coupled with a more inclusive view of Puebloan epistemologies and oral history. Finally, we use this evidence to support the hypothesis that the Katsina culture is an indigenous part of the Ancestral Puebloan Southwest which dates back at least as far as the Pueblo II period, and that our conception of the Puebloan world needs to be expanded exponentially in order to fully explore the ancestral roots of Katsinam and Puebloan ritual practices."

Please join us on October 16 for a fascinating discussion. If questions or for further information about the meeting time and location, contact the GCAS by emailing webmaster@gcasnm.org. Finally, watch this space for future posts on these two multitalented individuals!

/s/ webmaster [Left photo by Christine Szuter via Facebook; right photo via Leon Natker.]

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