NEXT MEETING: Wednesday, February 15, 2023, 5:00PM: The GCAS monthly IN-PERSON general meeting meets again at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico. about a block or two south of the intersection of Memory Lane and Hwy 180. Doors open at 5PM for folks to socialize and get settled. Light refreshments provided and OK to bring your own light snacks or handy meal (burrito, etc.) and beverage. Meeting starts at 5:30PM sharp with a brief to nonexistent business meeting followed at 5:45PM by our featured speaker, the redoubtable archaeologist Chris Adams. Chris will showcase for us the Feather Imagery Depicted on Mimbres Pottery. Expect meeting to adjourn about 7:00PM. As ever, in order to offer our members a safe and comfortable experience the GCAS follows CDC and New Mexico Department of Health guidelines for indoor gatherings including masking, distancing, and vaccinations. We recommend all attendees follow the same.

NEXT FIELD TRIP: February 5, 2023, we will meet at 10:00 AM at the MAREC HQ at the Mimbres Culture Heritage Site. We will have the Allard Bartlett and George Coleman collections on display with other select items including the GCAS's replica Clovis tool kit and a comparative sampling of artifact seashells and their modern counterparts. Possible trip to the nearby McAnally site may be included!

GCAS Field Trip Part IV: Marcia Corl, Today's Featured Photographer
GCAS Field Trip to Paquimé, Part VI

GCAS Field Trip to Paquimé, Part V

8 - Mata Ortiz 1930s-era churchTo read the complete narrative of the GCAS field trip of May 2-4, 2018, see Part I, Part II, Part III, and Part IV.

The second half of Day 2, May 3, 2018, comprised a tour of the area's historic structures, including a charming 1930s-era church in Juan Mata Ortiz.

In stark contrast to the small, well-tended church and grounds in Mata Ortiz, were 10 - Terrazas's Hacienda San Diegothe ruins of Hacienda San Diego, one of the mansions belonging to the early 20th-Century cattle baron Luis Terrazas. During the First Gilded Age, Luis Terrazas amassed a combined total of 7 million acres of ranch land, over 500,000 head of cattle, and a few hundred thousand head of horses, mules, and sheep. He was reputed at the time to be the largest individual land owner in the Americas. During the Mexican Revolution of 1916, Pancho Villa used his position as provisional governor to confiscate 11 - Hacienda San Diego portalTerrazas's land and slaughter all the livestock to feed the revolutionary army.

(This is an avocational archaeological website, so I will not personally comment upon the politics of the Terrazas-Villa era. I will leave it up to discerning websurfers to determine for themselves whether or not certain remarks are factually attributable to Luis Terrazas, such as, "Chihuahua comprises the largest part of my ranch," and "I am not from Chihuahua. Chihuahua is mine.")

The ruins of Hacienda San Diego date from 1902-1904 and comprise the mansion, a granary/warehouse building, stables, and workers' quarters. Efforts are underway to preserve and rehabilitate the structures with a view toward opening them for events and lodging in the distant future. The stables and the workers' quarters were built with adobe brick above an interesting foundation of field stones chinked with smaller flat stones. Similar chinking-and-stone methods of construction were used in the thresholds and lintels of the workers' quarters' doorways.

22 - Hacienda San Diego stables  Josh shows chinking method 24 - Hacienda San Diego workers' quarters' door 14 - LtoR = GB  Luis  Barbara  Julia Josh Reeves  Kevin 25 - Hacienda San Diego workers' quarters - canales y vigas 19 - Hacienda San Diego stables  rooftop prickly pear 20 - Hacienda San Diego stables still house horses and cattle 23 - Hacienda San Diego workers' quarters 18 - Hacienda San Diego stables  door lock

 

 

 

 

...to be continued in Part VI...

/s/ webmaster

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