NEXT MEETING: Wednesday, February 15, 2023, 5:00PM: The GCAS monthly IN-PERSON general meeting meets again at 2045 Memory Lane in Silver City, New Mexico. about a block or two south of the intersection of Memory Lane and Hwy 180. Doors open at 5PM for folks to socialize and get settled. Light refreshments provided and OK to bring your own light snacks or handy meal (burrito, etc.) and beverage. Meeting starts at 5:30PM sharp with a brief to nonexistent business meeting followed at 5:45PM by our featured speaker, the redoubtable archaeologist Chris Adams. Chris will showcase for us the Feather Imagery Depicted on Mimbres Pottery. Expect meeting to adjourn about 7:00PM. As ever, in order to offer our members a safe and comfortable experience the GCAS follows CDC and New Mexico Department of Health guidelines for indoor gatherings including masking, distancing, and vaccinations. We recommend all attendees follow the same.

NEXT FIELD TRIP: February 5, 2023, we will meet at 10:00 AM at the MAREC HQ at the Mimbres Culture Heritage Site. We will have the Allard Bartlett and George Coleman collections on display with other select items including the GCAS's replica Clovis tool kit and a comparative sampling of artifact seashells and their modern counterparts. Possible trip to the nearby McAnally site may be included!

GCAS Field Trip to Paquimé, Part II
GCAS Field Trip Part IV: Marcia Corl, Today's Featured Photographer

GCAS Field Trip to Paquimé, Part III

1 - Mata Ortiz detail work Potter fine detailTo read the complete narrative of the GCAS field trip of May 2-4, 2018, see Part I here, and Part II here.

Day 2: May 3, 2018. Shopping day in the artisans' town of Mata Ortiz. Because the Grant County Archaeological Society embraces art and culture in all its forms. (h/t Marcia Corl for close-up photo of fine ceramics detailing.)

Juan Mata Ortiz is a town of about 1200 people located several miles south- 5 - LtoR  Kevin  Meem and Lee examine potssouthwest of Nuevo Casas Grandes, Chihuahua, Mexico. It was established in the late 19th Century  as "Pearson," but after the 1916 Mexican Revolution it renamed itself "Juan Mata Ortiz" in memory of an army colonel and local hero who had fought against the Apache. The town's economy had been based exclusively on agriculture, but beginning in the late 1970s/early 1980s a ceramics tradition began to develop that now provides the town and its inhabitants with a more stable and diverse economy than agriculture alone had afforded.

Generally speaking, the shapes of Mata Ortiz ceramics and their motifs are a revival of, and a modern 23 - Museum  olla detail of turquoise paint  Mound of the Offerings22 - Museum  olla  Mound of the Offeringsinterpretation of, the prehispanic ceramics of the Paquimé culture. Many families in this small town include highly skilled ceramicists among their members. A Google of the phrase "Mata Ortiz ceramics" produces good examples of current Mata Ortiz ceramic art. These two photos of thousand-year-old ollas recovered from the ruins of Paquimé and which are now in the site's museum, illustrate the Paquimé style of ceramics on which modern Mata Ortiz pottery is based.

...to be continued in Part IV...

/s/ webmaster

 

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William Hudson

I'm loving the report of the Paquime trip. Looking forward to the next installment.

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